Philadelphia Stories Reviews Necessary Myths

I was thrilled to check into Facebook this morning and see that Philadelphia Stories magazine had posted a new review of my book Necessary Myths. In the review Peter Baroth says:

 

Clauser is a master of wordcraft. There is a kind of late afternoon buzz quality to his descriptions of nature – even in PSSummerCoverits impermanence. I can definitely see the sun setting on so much of what he describes where we can find such things as “a gossiping spring between rocks…” (“The Children Discover a Spring Between Rocks”). And also perhaps, ever so vaguely, there is a yearning for a terribly remote and tenuous unfallen past. A garden that was probably already beginning to petrify moments after its creation.

Read the entire review here.

You can order your own copy of Necessary Myths from Broadkill River Press here.

 

On twitter @uniambic

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Not Dead Yet, but Not for Lack of Trying

Poetry may not be dead yet, but we’re certainly on a path to talk it to death.

from the New York Times 7/28/14

Is Poetry Dead? Not if 45 Official Laureates Are Any Indication

More poetry matter from the New York Times 7/18/14

Does Poetry Matter?

And a response from the Los Angeles Review of Books 7/21/14

How Much Does Poetry Matter? 

 

On Making the Poetry Manuscript

On Making the Poetry Manuscript

The publisher of Tupelo Press offers advice on putting together a poetry manuscript.

Jeffrey Levine

The Poetry Manuscript: Arts and Crafts

Here, adapted from my article in the 2007 issue of the AWP Job List (there titled Thirteen Ways of Looking at the Poetry Manuscript:Some Ideas on Creation and Order) is a revised and updated advice on making a book out of your individual poems, given as one who reads three-to-four thousand manuscripts a year.

Admittedly, some of this advice remains concrete, generic, and “merely” stylistic, although I suppose even nuts and bolts have some intrinsic value when collected in one place. As style is a matter of taste, you must take into account that what I say reflects my own prejudices and preferences.

Many of these thoughts concern more artistic matters: What is the artistic process as applied to making a poetry manuscript cohere? What are some useful approaches to the art of transforming individual poems into a transcendent whole?

In the…

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